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Diver Joe, "The Diver Dude"
Bottom cleaning, hull cleaning, prop removal, prop maintenance, zinc inspection, zinc replacement, lost object recovery, underwater recovery, slavage, underater inspections ...
If it's below the waterline call:
Joe Condon "Diver Joe" at 239-470-2333
or email Joe at: TheDiverDude@gmail.com
Diving services provided in and around Cape Coral and Fort Myers, Florida

http://www.myfwc.com/WILDLIFEHABITATS/SaltFishID.htm

"One of the most intriguing aspects of Florida marine fishing is the constant repetition of the question, "What is it?".  Rare indeed is the angler who, at some time during a fishing trip, doesn't catch a fish that must be examined closely to determine its species. Small wonder.  Our waters have more than 1,000 species of marine fish, most of them edible and all of them interesting.  Of those, more than 40 are sufficiently important for their harvest to be regulated. Six species have game fish status (redfish, snook, tarpon, bonefish, sailfish, and permit over 20 inches in length), meaning that they may not be sold.

Learning to identify fish is a fascinating study in itself and is a matter of importance to the angler; misidentification of fish can lead to fisheries violations. Included in the following listing are 114 fish commonly caught by anglers in Florida. They are grouped into Families as listed in the American Fisheries Society publication, "Common and Scientific Names of Fishes."

Example:

Mullets: Fantail Mullet
Fantail Mullet - Illustrations and Copyright by Diane Rome Peebles

Family Mugilidae, MULLETS
Mugil gyrans


Illustrations and Copyright by Diane Rome Peebles
Illustrations are for viewing purposes only.


Description: color olive green with blue tints on back, shading to silvery sides, white below; anal and pelvic fins yellowish; dark blotch at base of pectoral fin; inverted V-shaped mouth; insertion of second dorsal over that of anal fin.

Similar Fish:
striped mullet, M. cephalus; white mullet, M. curema.

Where found:
INSHORE, occurring along beaches in the fall.

Size:
small mullet, less than 1 pound.

*Florida Record:
n/a

Remarks:
spawns in NEARSHORE or possibly INSHORE waters during spring and summer; juveniles occur INSHORE; feeds on algae, small crustaceans and detritus.

* The Florida records quoted are from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's printed publication, Fishing Lines and are not necessarily the most current ones. The records are provided as only as a benchmark.