Home
Boat Names
Bonaire Web Cams
CDC Red Tide
Coast Pilot
Corrosion
Fish Identification
Florida Anchorages
Florida Coral
Florida Marinas
Florida Yacht Clubs
Harmful Algal Blooms
Hebert Box
Key West Web Cams
Lightning Protection
Lightning Tracker 1
Mariners Danger
Minilobster
Nav Rules
NOAA Local Notices
NWS
Ocean Conveyor
Online Charts
Safety Class
Sea Grant Libraries
Sea Surface Temps
SFWMD Storm Tracks
Shark Attacks
Ships at Sea
Strom Tracks
Sunscreen Review
Surge Zones
TAFB Unified Analysis
Tides
Tropical Models
Tropical Surge
TS Heat Potential
US Notice to Mariners
VHF Channels
Weather Loop 1

Diver Joe, "The Diver Dude"
Bottom cleaning, hull cleaning, prop removal, prop maintenance, zinc inspection, zinc replacement, lost object recovery, underwater recovery, slavage, underater inspections ...
If it's below the waterline call:
Joe Condon "Diver Joe" at 239-470-2333
or email Joe at: TheDiverDude@gmail.com
Diving services provided in and around Cape Coral and Fort Myers, Florida

http://www.boatus.com/boattech/MarineCorrosion.htm

Types of Marine Corrosion


Metal parts underwater are subjected to two basic types of corrosion: galvanic corrosion and stray current corrosion. Both can harm your boat, propeller, and motor if not correctly monitored and avoided.

What is Corrosion?
There is nothing mysterious about corrosion. The process metal goes through in changing is slightly complicated, but not especially complex.

To best describe corrosion, let’s start with the most common type, rust. We all know rust, but to understand rust, we have to go back to the very beginning. Iron ore has a chemical composition of two iron atoms bonded with three oxygen atoms. As it is mined out of the ground, it’s a brownish-red powder useless to us. But by refining, purifying, and smelting, we create iron, which is useful. We can use it as plain iron, or we can process it further and combine it with other elements to get different types of steel.

Let’s say the iron is made into hinges for your backyard fence. Everyone knows that if you leave iron out in the rain, it rusts. If it rusts long and badly enough, the metal disappears and you’re left with a pile of brownish-red powder-rust or iron oxide, which has the same composition as iron ore.

Here’s why. Iron atoms want to return to their normal state as iron ore, iron oxide, or rust. Which are all the same things. That’s the state in which iron is most comfortable and most stable. Left alone, it won’t turn into anything else. And most metals used in manufactured products want to do the same—return to their natural state.